Honoring Pat Conroy

Pat Conroy was a Southern literary institution, and next month two Atlanta-based literary groups will honor the best-selling author with tributes and personal memories of the man who wrote The Great Santini, The Prince of Tides, and The Water is Wide. Conroy died of pancreatic cancer on March 4 at the age of 70. He […]

In Love with Shakespeare

My two friends and I hadn’t been to Stratford, Ontario, for the annual Shakespeare Festival for probably 13 years, and we were thrilled to again visit one of the foremost such events in the world. Before we left, however, we attended a concert of music associated with Shakespeare performed by my own choral group, the […]

And The Winners Are . . .

Whew! The judges for the Atlanta Writers Club 2016 Writing Contest were busy this year doing the difficult job of choosing three winners out of a field of 104 entries, about double the club’s usual 60 to 62. But choose they did. Sandra Hood took the Terry Kay Prize for Fiction for her short story […]

Let’s Lift Every Voice and Sing: Music of the Episcopal Hymnal

I was raised in the Methodist Church, but the first time I walked into an Episcopal Church, I was blown away by the music. That was when I was 19 and attending West Georgia College in Carrollton. My friend and I went to St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church. Much of the liturgy* was sung, and there […]

Twain’s End: Samuel Clemens the Man vs. Mark Twain the Legend

In Lynn Cullen’s latest novel, Twain’s End, Samuel Clemens, otherwise known as Mark Twain, comes across as a cantankerous, controlling, capricious, and arrogant old man – at least around those closest to him. What a blow! In his day, he was the most famous man in America because of his stories and his quick wit. […]

Three Long Mountains and a Wood

When I was in Camden, Maine, in late May, I took the Edna St. Vincent Millay walking tour. Granted, more than 100 years after this Pulitzer Prize-winning poet left the town where she grew up, there isn’t much left to see of her. The small house where she lived on Chestnut Street, a block away […]

A Burnable Book of Prophecy and Treason

 Burnable Book by Bruce Holsinger begins with a young woman shoving a book to the maudlyn Agnes, hidden in a copse in the Moorfields outside London gate. Only seconds later, Agnes witnesses the woman’s torture and murder by a man who keeps demanding, “Doovay leebro?” And the woman’s last words, “Though fawn escape the falcon’s […]