Natasha Trethewey and Our Shared History

Readers Unbound is privileged to welcome Pearl McHaney as today’s guest blogger.  Many readers shy away from poetry, afraid of not understanding, expecting not to been entertained.  American poet and pediatrician William Carlos Williams wrote a long love poem titled “Asphodel, That Greeny Flower.”   Near its end, I find my mantra for the significance […]

History, Haikus and Homage to the Past

What do the Daniel Island Historical Society, of Daniel Island, South Carolina (DIHS), and a Haiku have in common? On the surface, it would appear as if they were unrelated. Yet digging deeper into our past reveals that history may be their common thread. Despite today’s ‘modern-day’ era which continuously shouts, ‘What’s next? And what’s […]

Light of the World: A Memoir of Loss and Continuing Love

This amazing memoir begins with tragedy—Ficre Ghebreyesus, husband of renowned poet Elizabeth Alexander, dies suddenly of a massive heart attack while on a treadmill at their home just four days after his 50th birthday party.  Although it may be categorized as a “grief memoir,” Light of the World is not a book that dwells solely on the […]

“The More Mysterious Life”: Jewish High Holiday liturgy, Leonard Cohen songs, and Geraldine Brooks’ new novel

As summer turns to fall, the season rolls into a celebration of Jewish holidays, one stacked upon another. This week is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, and it begins a ten day period known as the days of repentance. A traditional prayer, the Unetaneh Tokef, said during both Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, acknowledges […]

From Heart to Page: Lancing the Boil of Grief

Do not stand at my grave and weep; I am not there. I do not sleep…. Do not stand at my grave and cry; I am not there, I did not die. (Excerpts from “Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep” by Mary Frye) Once upon a time I would have found this poem […]

Three Long Mountains and a Wood

When I was in Camden, Maine, in late May, I took the Edna St. Vincent Millay walking tour. Granted, more than 100 years after this Pulitzer Prize-winning poet left the town where she grew up, there isn’t much left to see of her. The small house where she lived on Chestnut Street, a block away […]

Walt Whitman Discovery in Washington, DC

    I have never been one to read a lot of poetry—love to read almost anything, including cereal boxes but was not drawn to verse.  That changed somewhat last October when I was visiting Washington, DC with a friend, and we saw a long, chiseled inscription in the curving granite wall surrounding our Metro station at Dupont […]