The Storyteller Doll: Singing Symbols of Love and Union, Part 1

People often ask writers, Where do you get your stories? One answer is, They are all around you.  Listen. It was in the Santa Fe Museum of Indian Arts & Culture that I first saw them, a collection of clay figurines made by the Pueblo people of New Mexico. Based on the tradition of the […]

The Vagabond’s Saga: Reading two clan narratives separated by a thousand years

Five days from now I’m leaving my fluttery skirts and tank-tops behind and going to Iceland. I’ve skimmed a guidebook or two, but mostly I’m preparing by reading The Sagas of Icelanders. Sure, it might not be super relevant to cafés in Reykjavik or useful as to which camping sites are the best, but for […]

By My Halidome! The Use and Overuse of Period Language in Historical Novels

Gentle reader, prithee tarry thou a moment in mine company, for by my troth, a tale I would fain unfold for thee. List and learn… And there you have it: gadzookery, the intemperate and/or unskillful use of archaic language. If you’re a reader of historical fiction, you’re no doubt familiar with the phenomenon. And if, […]

The Most Translated Writer You’ve Never Read: Stefan Zweig and His Austria

Before I travel, I like to immerse myself in some of the culture of the place. Soon to embark on a trip to Central Europe, I’ve been watching foreign films and discovering the work of authors I’ve never read. One of these authors is Stefan Zweig, prolific writer and especially master of the art of […]

Let’s get pinned! Pinterest for Readers and Writers

Let’s start this piece off with an important clarification. P-I-N-T-E-R-E-S-T is not a misspelling! Pinterest is the correct spelling of an online application for sharing pictures, links, and content. In essence, Pinterest is a virtual bulletin board. Pinterest can be an amazing tool for readers and writers. Gurus that tout the benefits of author platforms […]

The Case for Fairy Tales Part 2: Villains as Allies

Everybody knows the story of the Three Little Pigs. Or at least they think they do. But I’ll let you in on a little secret. Nobody knows the real story, because nobody has ever heard my side of the story.  So narrates A. Wolf in The True Story of the Three Little Pigs. In this […]

Unexpected Literary Finds on a New Zealand Birding Expedition

Lifetime literary challenge to self:  Visit as many women authors’ museums as I can find in my travels and take inspiration from them. Buy a book, take a photo, read her work. It’s a project that has led me to an invigorating list of authors I might never have otherwise chosen. Part of the fun […]

History, Haikus and Homage to the Past

What do the Daniel Island Historical Society, of Daniel Island, South Carolina (DIHS), and a Haiku have in common? On the surface, it would appear as if they were unrelated. Yet digging deeper into our past reveals that history may be their common thread. Despite today’s ‘modern-day’ era which continuously shouts, ‘What’s next? And what’s […]

Outrunning the Villagers Carrying Torches and Pitchforks: A Review of Mongrels by Stephen Graham Jones

Do you consider a rare steak overcooked? Does a full moon make you want to rip off your clothes and howl? Is lycanthropy your favorite four-syllable word? Are An American Werewolf in London and its sequel …in Paris your go-to date movies? If so, you might be a werewolf wannabe, but you’re not the real […]

And The Winners Are . . .

Whew! The judges for the Atlanta Writers Club 2016 Writing Contest were busy this year doing the difficult job of choosing three winners out of a field of 104 entries, about double the club’s usual 60 to 62. But choose they did. Sandra Hood took the Terry Kay Prize for Fiction for her short story […]