Historical Novelist Lynn Cullen, Part 1: Mrs. Poe, Frances Osgood, and the Author Herself

Received this post as an email? Click on the blue title to read in your browser. I hadn’t seen my friend Lynn Cullen since the launch of her historical novel Reign of Madness in 2011, though we’d been in touch via email. But this morning we were meeting for breakfast at Goldberg’s Deli in Toco […]

Robert Coram: Military Biographer, Part Two

Did you receive this post via email? Please click on the title to read in your browser. Tuesday, I introduced you to military biographer Robert Coram, told you about his background, and discussed his approach to writing. Today–a bit about his biographies, the three he’s published and the one still in draft stage. Boyd: The […]

Robert Coram: Military Biographer, Part One

  Did you receive this post via email? Please click on the title to read in your browser. “I have the best job in the world,” says Robert Coram. “I get to write about American heroes.” His theme is particularly timely for this week of Memorial Day, May 26th. The hardest thing for Coram is […]

Frost in Springtime

T. S. Eliot may have felt that “April is the cruellest Month,” but not in lovely Decatur, Georgia, where Spring has at long last arrived. It’s short-sleeve weather full of sunny days and blooming trees. We are bound today for Agnes Scott College’s McCain Library to view the Robert Frost Collection, a fitting pilgrimage for National […]

The Novelty of Truth – The Kidney Sellers: A Journey of Discovery in Iran

Today, Readers Unbound welcomes guest blogger  Sigrid Fry-Revere, whose book The Kidney Sellers will launch March 1st. Dr. Fry-Revere is the ethics consultant for the Washington Regional Transplant Community’s Organ and Tissue Advisory Committee and project director of the Center for Ethical Solution’s SOS (Solving the Organ Shortage) project. She has written hundreds of articles for […]

Freshly Baked Books: This Dark Road to Mercy

I’ve been reading a lot of new Southern fiction lately. Much of it has reminded me of  overwrought Beasts of the Southern Wild emerging from our swamps and parading across the nation’s imagination. Now I love a good  gothic grotesque character as much as the next person, but not every writer possesses the credentials of […]

Robert Burns, Very Much at Home in Atlanta

The following is a reprint of an article I did several years ago for my clan journal, Journal of the Clan Campbell Society (North America). (Burns is a sept of Clan Campbell.) January 25th is a day of celebration around the world. From Montana to Moscow, India to Indiana, admirers of Robert Burns honor him with […]

Peace, Joy, and Love

Happy Holidays from Readers Unbound. We’ll return January 8th with all new posts on the written word. Meanwhile, let’s see what some of the Masters have to say. Literature is my Utopia. Here I am not disenfranchised. No barrier of the senses shuts me out from the sweet, gracious discourse of my book friends. They […]

Gifts Matter

Today, Readers Unbound is pleased to host guest blogger Rona Simmons. Rona Simmons is the author of The Quiet Room, a historical novel set in Evansville, Indiana, a town generations of her family called home.  Her previous works include a ghostwritten biography of a prominent Atlanta businessman, a collection of short stories compiled from interviews […]

The Yin and Yang of Poetry and Community, a Conversation with HawaH: Part 2

The clouds converse Over a glass of sunset. The sky is drunk From light. – “Light” by HawaH, The Poetry of Yoga, V. 2, 35. Yesterday, we celebrated the year anniversary of The Poetry of Yoga, Volume 2. Today let’s take a closer look at HawaH, the man who edited the two volumes and the poet whose […]