Welcome to Braggsville: Old Times There Are Not Forgotten

For years, Uncle Charles had rhapsodized about our Snell family roots in tiny Oconee, Georgia, stop #14 on the Central of Georgia Railroad between Macon and Savannah. Oconee (population 280) is the heart of Georgia and site of the Civil War Battle of Ball’s Ferry at the Oconee River Bridge. When I decided I wanted […]

Freshly Baked Books: The Pocket Wife

The Pocket Wife is Dana Catrell, who feels she is slowly going crazy. Celia, Dana’s friend and neighbor, has been murdered, and Dana suspects that she is the killer. Published by HarperCollins and launching on March 17, The Pocket Wife is Susan Crawford’s first novel, and it’s a humdinger. It follows the stories of Dana […]

Fishing – And Other Things I Had to Learn

“How long did it take you to write your book?”  David asked, holding out his copy for me to sign. “Two years to write, but at least a decade of research,” I probably answered. That’s what I usually say, but it’s only part of the truth. Sight In The Sandstorm: Jesus in His World and […]

Walt Whitman Discovery in Washington, DC

    I have never been one to read a lot of poetry—love to read almost anything, including cereal boxes but was not drawn to verse.  That changed somewhat last October when I was visiting Washington, DC with a friend, and we saw a long, chiseled inscription in the curving granite wall surrounding our Metro station at Dupont […]

One Thousand Scheherazades and Folktales Three Ways

Alcée Fortier doesn’t get it. He’s spent decades listening, absorbing, and translating a vast collection of stories recounted by the humans living in and around the great estate of Le Petit Versailles built by his grandfather – the first to refine sugar in Louisiana – Valcour Aimé. It is a strange fact that the old […]

“JUSQU’AUBOUTISTE”: A Review of Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson

I never formally studied World War I in school, so it may be that most of what I know about the war comes from Stanley Kubrick’s film Paths of Glory. If you’ve seen the film, you’ll know it has little to do with the war’s historical timeline, or the reasons for the war itself. It focuses […]

Literary Day Trips: Close to Home, Easy on the Wallet

Back at Christmas and New Years, I introduced you to two of our pages, author signings and writing groups. Today, I’ve posted an excerpt from our Georgia Authors’ Homes & Museums page. For the complete list, click on the heading, in red, on the top right hand corner of this page. Consider starting with the link […]